How to Prevent Forest Fires

A substantial number of Maine forest fires are sparked by reckless smokers and campers.

The fire threat in Maine has become a serious matter with its 16,270,000 acres of forest land.

In 1948 Maine received 243,229 fishing and hunting licenses. This army of hunters, fishermen and campers may be of great assistance in avoiding forest fires.

In Maine forest fires burnt more than 24,203 acres in 1944.

A series of fires burned between 175,000 and 200,000 hectares of forest in 1947 and destroyed almost half of Mount Desert Island.

When fires are permitted to assert their heavy toll, the opportunities for entertainment, sport and other outdoor activities as provided in some parts of this State will no longer be open.

Hunters, fishermen and campers will consider and enforce a few basic rules on forest fire safety as follows in order to better manage this yearly loss:

Remove all flammable content before lighting the gas.

Do not throw away your match — split it in two, walk on it, and be sure it’s out.

Do not throw cigarette butts from the window of an car.

Never build fire in front of a log, tree or stump.

Never burn a candle, or try to knock it out.

Pour a lot of water over your flames, or use a lot of soil.

When you think this is done, make sure that you feel it with your fingertips.

(Until the last spark’s extinguished, a fire is never out).

Call the nearest Fire Warden or Lookout Station, if a fire gets beyond your reach.

Maine now has about 200 Maine Forest Service campsites where natives and non-residents can light fires without penalty or accompanied by a licensed guide. (They are for provisional use). Parties using these sites are requested to use care when disposing of refuse and to take precautions against potential water supply pollution. Every group is asked to put out its fire with water upon holiday, remove all tents or shelters and pick up all the rubbish.

Maine currently has 424 permit campsites made available through the Maine Forest Service, and 426 campsites on public reserve lands, as well as many others in state parks and other areas. Camping knowledge, parks and much more can be found through the Maine Conservation Department at maine.gov/doc

These camp sites are all situated along well-traveled roads , trails and streams, and are useful for water supply.

Maine Highway Department will provide maps that show every interested party the location of these.

Be sure your fire is out until you leave, when you camp.

Hunters, fishermen and campers will consider and enforce a few basic rules on forest fire safety as follows in order to better manage this yearly loss:

Remove all flammable content before lighting the gas.

Do not throw away your match — split it in two, walk on it, and be sure it’s out.

Do not throw cigarette butts from the window of an car.

Never build fire in front of a log, tree or stump.

Never burn a candle, or try to knock it out.

Pour a lot of water over your flames, or use a lot of soil.

When you think this is done, make sure that you feel it with your fingertips.

(Until the last spark’s extinguished, a fire is never out).

Call the nearest Fire Warden or Lookout Station, if a fire gets beyond your reach.

Maine now has around 200 Maine Forest Service campsites where natives and non-residents can light fires without penalty or accompanied by a licensed guide. (They are for provisional use). Parties using these sites are requested to use care when disposing of refuse and to take measures against potential water supply pollution. -Every group is asked to put out its fire with water upon holiday, remove all tents or shelters and pick up all the rubbish.

Maine currently has 424 permit campsites made available via the Maine Forest Service, and 426 campsites on public forest lands, as well as many others in state parks and other areas. Camping knowledge, parks and much more can be found via the Maine Conservation Department at maine.gov/doc

These camp sites are all situated along well-traveled paths, trails and streams, and are useful for water supply.

Maine Highway Department will include maps that give every interested party the location of these.

Be sure your fire is out until you leave, when you sleep.

A decent number of fires can be stopped if the smoker just stops worrying and sees that his match, cigarette, cigar stub or pipe ashes are absolutely out.

The forests are the greatest inheritance that the people of Maine have ever been given. Smokers and fishermen are supposed to always be aware of helping to keep them safe. When fires burn the woods surrounding the head waters of tiny trout streams, the tiny spring feeders dry up and many trout die in need of water.

Broken bottles or broken glass left by picnic parties and transients in the woods may create a source for forest fires. Curved bits of glass will intensify the sun’s rays falling on them to the point that fire will erupt beneath the dry leaves, duffs or humus.

A forest fire is the safest time to stop right before you start it. A forest that is Fire-Proof needs one hundred per cent public cooperation. Wild Life is forest based. Keep yourself safe.

Sportsmen built campfires throughout the 1930s and ‘ 40s for warmth and cooking. Campfires are rarely a requirement anymore, though they are still common, thanks to advancements in camping equipment. Campers use some wilderness lands so extensively that their forest floors were cleaned up clean from fallen trees, and campfires are not permitted at all.